So explain the flow of a typical dungeoneer game. . .

Dungeoneer the RPG is fast paced and easy to learn, and yet is packed with depth and tactical game play. You can set up your game session in moments and enjoy playing for hours.

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OURUlz
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So explain the flow of a typical dungeoneer game. . .

Post by OURUlz » Sat Nov 03, 2007 6:04 am

Since this is a hybrid game, and its got some roots in a lot of dungeon crawl boardgames, how will a Dungeoneer RPG session differ from a typical Dungeons and Dragons session? I've already mentioned some things I don't like about RPG games in other posts. One thing I don't like is the down time between segments of the game. Like Town business between adventures ... and a bunch of random encounters that sap your resources and time before you get to the dungeon. It sounds like the Dungeoneer RPG dumps you right in the middle of the action without having to mess with a lot of these time draining elements.
Nobody wants to do the math to hit Armor Class 42...do you here me? Nobody.

Thomas Denmark
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Post by Thomas Denmark » Sat Nov 03, 2007 9:05 pm

warpweaver could probably explain this better than me, but I'll give it a try.

Player's create their characters through a simple system of 5 cards that are chosen, these determine race, template, culture, calling, and aptitude. To roughly put these in "D&D" terms they are analogous to race, class, region, alignment, and feats.

The Dungeonlord performs the traditional role of Dungeon Master. She creates an adventure with a combination of a Quest tree (fulfill Quest A to have access to Quest B and so on), Maps, and a selection of Adventure cards (monsters and things that will be encountered in the adventure).

Players role-play to acquire clues to their Quests. They complete Quests to gain levels. Levels generally add to basic stats (Melee, Magic, and Speed). At certain levels: 1 (heroic) 4 (epic) and 7 (legendary) they get access to new templates (like prestige classes) and special abilities.

Upon completing the final Quest and/or achieving 10th level the characters complete the game and are retired as legendary heroes and/or demigods. This can take 16 - 32 hours or so to complete.

In many ways it is like a boardgame, but more so like an RPG with cards as props and a genuine win goal.
Thomas Denmark
www.studiodenmark.com

OURUlz
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Post by OURUlz » Sun Nov 04, 2007 5:36 am

Thomas,

You did a nifty job explaining the game. Now I have a picture in head to go by. Again, I'm looking forward to this game. I'm a school teacher so I have the summers off, and this summer I toyed around with making my own homebrew RPG for me and my nephews to play. This was because most things on the market didn't fit the bill of what we like to play together. Me, give me a character sheet, four hit points and a dagger and I'm ready to go. But my nephews play video games and they have video game expectations. I toyed around with the idea of simplified dice rolls, very little book keeping, and visuals-- tons of visuals. But since I'm not an artist, that's about as far as it went.
Anyway, The game I visualized or at least wanted to visualize :lol: is the game you guys are working on. I bought the Dungeoneer XCG and we're going to play it next weekend so when the RPG comes around we'll be ready.
Nobody wants to do the math to hit Armor Class 42...do you here me? Nobody.

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