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Happy Birthday to Merritt and Howard!

Posted by on 12:42 pm in Latest News | 0 comments

Happy Birthday to Merritt and Howard!

Happy Birthday to Merritt and Howard! Happy birthday to Abraham Merritt (Jan 20) and Robert E. Howard (Jan 22), two authors who influenced DCC RPG in big ways! Though today Abraham Merritt is one of the more obscure authors listed in Appendix N, he was very influential on other authors of his time and later. Fellow Appendix N author H.P. Lovecraft was a huge fan of Merritt’s work, and Michael Moorcock lists two of Merritt’s books in Fantasy: The Best 100 Books. Today is Merritt’s 133rd birthday. Merritt was a journalist by profession, and his work writing stories of science fiction and fantasy was a side project. His works often involve ancient advanced races that live beneath the surface of the earth or in inaccessible locations, whose horrific societies and cultures are stumbled upon by people from the surface world. That’s pretty much the very archetype for a dungeon crawl! The forthcoming DCC #93: Moon-Slaves of the Cannibal Kingdom by Edgar Johnson is inspired by Merritt’s works, and DCC #68: The People of the Pit by Joseph Goodman is a tribute to Merritt’s story of the same name. Robert E. Howard is an author who should need no introduction. His most famous creation, of course, is Conan the Barbarian, but he’s also known for Kull of Atlantis, Solomon Kane, Bran mak Morn, and more. In addition to being one of the pioneers of the “sword and sorcery” genre, Howard wrote stories in just about every other genre as well: westerns, detectives, historical fiction, horror, poetry, and even comedy and “spicy” stories! He was an amateur boxer and also penned boxing stories featuring several different characters. Howard died in 1936 at the age of 30. His mother suffered from tuberculosis , and upon learning that she had entered a coma from which she was not expected to awaken, Howard shot himself in the head. He was at the height of his career, having made more money that year from his writing than he ever had before. This year would be his eleventy-first birthday. Michael Curtis’ adventure DCC #73: Emirikol Was Framed has some Howard DNA in it, mostly in the inspiration for Emirikol’s shifting tower. Harley Stroh’s DCC #84: Peril on the Purple Planet draws from Howard’s “Almuric” stories. DCC #82.5: Dragora’s Dungeon has elements of the Conan story “Red Nails”, and DCC #51.5: The Sinister Secret of Whiterock draws from “Worms of the Earth”. For those interested in reading the original stories in the original format, Goodman Games offers reprints of select issues of Weird Tales and Strange Tales featuring Merritt, Howard, and other pulp authors of the...

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Forgotten Treasure: The Croaking Fane

Posted by on 12:09 pm in Forgotten Treasure, Latest News | 0 comments

Forgotten Treasure: The Croaking Fane

Forgotten Treasure: The Croaking Fane If demonic amphibians are your thing (and you know they are), then DCC #77: The Croaking Fane is a must have adventure for your collection. In this level 3 module by Michael Curtis, the followers of the amphibian god Schaphigroadaz have mysteriously vanished, leaving their temples in the swamp empty. The adventurers travel through muck and mire to explore one such temple, determined to see what treasures the cultists have left behind. Though there are no priests left, it does not mean the fane is unprotected… The first thing you need to know about this adventure is that “fane” is a real word. It’s a late Middle English word meaning a temple or shrine. The second thing you need to know is that if detailed descriptions of toads, snakes, and other creepy-crawly swamp creatures freak you out, you may want to skip this one. The Croaking Fane has some of the best boxed text in the entire DCC RPG line. “Without giving away too much, the toad cavern is my absolute favorite,” Michael says. “I’m not even squeamish when it comes to animals like snakes, frogs, lizard, etc., but this one gives me the willies when I picture it in my head. I think I would be physically nauseated if I ever saw that room for myself. I’m also pretty proud of the boxed text description for that encounter. After I’ve made certain that the written descriptions in an adventure work during playtests, I seldom bother with reading them verbatim whenever I run the adventure again. This is one piece of boxed text I always recite, however, because I think it’s the perfect mix of Gygaxian purple prose and Curtis’ sensibilities.” The Croaking Fane was originally written for classic D&D as a tribute to Dave Arneson and his original Blackmoor adventure “The Temple of the Frog“. It was originally released as a free download titled The Fane of St. Toad. Though the Temple of the Frog is the main influence, The Croaking Fane has some distinct Appendix N influences as well. “Clark Ashton Smith’s stories had an influence on The Croaking Fane,” explains Michael. “In fact, one of the encounters in the adventure owes a big debt to Smith’s ‘The Tale of Satampra Zeiros‘. I won’t say more to avoid ruining the surprise. Lastly, you can’t go far into C.A.S. country without walking with H.P. Lovecraft for a while. There’s definitely some Lovecraftian DNA in there too.” As this was Michael’s third adventure with Goodman Games, he was mostly trusted to write a good adventure without direct supervision. Joseph Goodman’s only input came at the end when he requested a few tweaks. “The biggest one I remember,” Michael says, “had to do with one of the rooms in the Fane where the cultists would entertain their batrachian allies. In the original draft, the description of that room’s décor was a little more risqué than what made it to the page. I toned it down a bit for adolescent readers, but I think adults can read through the lines enough to picture the room as originally intended.” [They absolutely can. I ran a playtest of it at a convention, and the looks on the faces of the players when comprehension set in were priceless! I hadn’t read the room...

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Special Offer! Free Vintage Novels!

Posted by on 9:45 pm in Latest News | 0 comments

Special Offer! Free Vintage Novels!

Special Offer! Free Vintage Novels! Get a FREE vintage novel with every online store print purchase! As many of you already know, DCC RPG and its many adventures were inspired by the famed “Appendix N” list of fantasy and SF books. Goodman Games recently came into possession of a huge collection of these and other classic paperback novels, and guess what oh Faithful One? Our good fortune is now your good fortune! Now through the end of February (or until we run out of books), each online store order for print or physical products comes with a free vintage novel. We can’t guarantee that each and every one is from the famed Appendix N list, but if not then they shared the same shelf space with those authors. Heck, with especially large orders we might even throw in TWO novels. Bemused, enthused, and slightly confused — that’s the Goodman Games crew. The Dark Master likes it that way.  ...

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New Items In Our Store – Including Dice!

Posted by on 10:07 pm in Latest News | 0 comments

New Items In Our Store – Including Dice!

New Items In Our Store – Including Dice! New third-party products, the Spanish translation of DCC RPG, and GameScience dice can be purchased in our web store! Rock God Death-Fugue by Steve Bean is a DCC -compatible one-shot that lets players roleplay as members of a band kicking off its first world tour. In The Curse of Cragbridge adventurers investigate a haunted bridge tower and its fabled treasures. Clasicos del Mazmorreo is the Spanish translation of DCC RPG, and there is also the Spanish translation of Sailors on the Starless Sea and the DCC RPG Judges Screen! GameScience dice are the most precise dice in the multiverse, and now you can get sets of 12 with a choice of 17 different colors. The D7 with pips is an oddity that is supplied (but not manufactured) by GameScience. Rock God Death-FugueCurse of CragbridgeClasicos del Mazmorreo Marineros del Mar Sin EstrellasDCC Judges Screen (Spanish)D7 die GameScience Dice Set (12...

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Forgotten Treasure: The Adventure Begins

Posted by on 10:41 pm in Forgotten Treasure, Latest News | 0 comments

Forgotten Treasure: The Adventure Begins

Forgotten Treasure: The Adventure Begins Back in the days of 3.5E Dungeon Crawl Classics, Joseph Goodman decided he wanted to publish a tome of 1st level adventures. That idea turned into the very first hardcover DCC product- DCC #29: The Adventure Begins. Aside from just being a fantastic collection of low-level excitement, The Adventure Begins has quite a few connections to the DCC RPG of today. If you followed DCC back in the pre-DCC RPG days, you’ll recognize a lot of the names involved in this project: Adrian Pommier, Phillip Larwood, Andrew Hind, Michael Ferguson, Jeff LaSala, and others. But never fear, even those who are hard core DCC RPG fans can find a lot to like in this book: adventures by Harley Stroh, Brendan LaSalle, and Dieter Zimmerman; and art by Stefan Poag, Brad McDevitt, Doug Kovacs, and Jim Roslof. DCC RPG collectors will probably recognize the art on the cover as the same Jim Roslof cover from DCC #76.5: Well of the Worm. That’s because Well of the Worm was originally an adventure in this book! According to its author Harley Stroh, “The adventure was the first of several adventures written after REH’s classic, Worms of the Earth. The setting was inspired by the war-torn landscape featured in Kurosawa’s epics – muddy earth saturated with blood and torn from the stamp of hob-nailed boots and the hooves of warhorses.” Doug Kovacs did the interior art for the adventure “bringing two of my favorite artists together,” says Harley, “thoroughly outclassing the adventure’s author.” Harley has a second adventure in DCC #29 that DCC RPG fans will also know: “Tower of the Black Pearl”. Tower of the Black Pearl is notable for the first appearance of the sorcerer who would one day be known as Sezrekan. In the original adventure, he spells his name Sezrakan. “He goes through a couple spelling changes between 3.5 and DCC RPG,” says Harley, “It’s a demonology thing. I had no plans for Sez at the time, but it brings me no end of delight to see that he lives on in gaming tables around the world.” Tower sports an optional ending where every good-aligned PC (or NPC) hero in the world is slain as the tower’s magic comes to a tragic end. Harley loves it. “This sort of world-shattering event is usually saved for RPG novels, or barring that, 20th level adventures. That Goodman Games was willing to let it be written into a first-level adventure certainly presaged the DCC RPG.” The adventure has a couple tributes that may not be obvious. The pirate captain Savage Quenn is named for Jeffrey Quinn, the author of the very first DCC adventure Idylls of the Rat King. Quenn’s rapier is named Whisker, which is a nod to Gray Mouser’s blades Scalpel and Cat’s Claw. Tower of the Black Pearl was converted to DCC RPG as DCC #79.5: Tower of the Black Pearl. Brendan LaSalle’s contribution to The Adventure Begins has not yet been converted to DCC RPG, but it’s still a fun time! “When Kobolds Fly” pits the adventurers against a gang of hang-gliding kobolds. The original title for the adventure was “The Kobolds From Hell”, but Joseph Goodman renamed it. “I am very pleased with the change,” Brendan admits. “I think I would feel...

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Moon-Slaves of the Cannibal Kingdom coming soon!

Posted by on 10:07 am in Latest News | 0 comments

Moon-Slaves of the Cannibal Kingdom coming soon!

Moon-Slaves of the Cannibal Kingdom coming soon! Inspired heavily by the works of Abraham Merritt, DCC #93: Moon-Slaves of the Cannibal Kingdom is a level 2 DCC RPG module by Edgar Johnson. Far to the west, beyond civilized lands, lie the Tolomak Islands— volcanic peaks covered in pestilential jungle and bestriding sunken ruins. The legends say the Tolomaks are home to treacherous witches, ferocious cannibals, moon demons, and worse! Wise are those who steer well away from these accursed jungle isles, but not everyone is wise… For the legends also speak of power unimaginable and treasures beyond the limits of mortal avarice. Now, under the light of the triple moons, a band of intrepid adventurers sails ever nearer the islands. With luck, they will escape with a fortune; without it, they may not keep their souls. Also coming soon is the second printing of DCC #82: Bride of the Black Manse. This printing features a brand new cover by Stefan...

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Limited Kickstarter Edition Slipcases

Posted by on 5:43 pm in Latest News | 0 comments

Limited Kickstarter Edition Slipcases

Limited Kickstarter Edition Slipcases Slipcases are the mark of a truly fine publication, and we have limited numbers of a few slipcased books from recent Kickstarters to offer you! Grimtooth’s Ultimate Traps Collection, Foil Cover with Slipcase is in stock now and ready to ship! The Judges Guild Deluxe Collector’s Edition with Slipcase will ship in a couple weeks. Both of these books are extremely high quality tomes reproducing exciting parts of roleplaying history. Order yours soon, before they’re forever...

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Weird Tales and More in Our Store!

Posted by on 9:18 pm in Latest News, Now in Stores | 0 comments

Weird Tales and More in Our Store!

Weird Tales and More in Our Store! We have nine new pulp magazine reprints available in the Appendix N section of our web store! These reprints of Weird Tales and Strange Tales feature the first printings of various Appendix N authors such as Robert E. Howard, H.P. Lovecraft, August Derleth, Clark Ashton Smith, Manly Wade Wellman, and more! These are a must-have for any hard-core Appendix N fan. Also brand new is Escape From the Shrouded Fen, a combination funnel and 1st level DCC RPG adventure written by Terry Olson and published by Purple Sorcerer Games. A whopping 112 pages, plus an additional 61 pages of PDF material on the Purple Sorcerer...

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Forgotten Treasure: Crypt of the Devil-Lich

Posted by on 8:50 pm in Forgotten Treasure, Latest News | 0 comments

Forgotten Treasure: Crypt of the Devil-Lich

Forgotten Treasure: Crypt of the Devil-Lich Before the Hypercube of Myt, before The Seven Pits of Sezrekan, before DCC RPG even existed as its own game, the Dungeon Crawl Classics tournament was a much-anticipated event at every Gen Con. Using all their cunning and conserving resources as much as possible, could your characters survive the perils of whatever killer dungeon the Goodman Games stable of writers cooked up that year? And could they do it better than all the other teams to win the tournament trophies? The question was first posed in 2004 at the first DCC tournament. The adventure was a 96-page killer dungeon designed specifically for the tourney that was later published as DCC #13: Crypt of the Devil Lich. DCC author and former RPGA tourney organizer Chris Doyle met with Joseph Goodman at an Irish pub, and the idea was born. “Joe really wanted to run an old school Dungeon Crawl Classics Team Tourney at GenCon in 2004,” says Chris. “We discussed the classic meat-grinder Tomb of Horrors, and how cool it would be to assemble an assortment of proven game designers to each design a few awesome encounters for a deadly dungeon. The project really appealed to me, and a few hours later we had a loose framework in place for The Crypt of the Devil-Lich. Joe would assemble the writers, and I would serve as the developer, and tourney organizer at GenCon in August, 2004.” In addition to Chris and Joseph, the staff of writers included Mike Ferguson, Andrew Hind, Jason Little, Adrian Pommier, Jeffrey Quinn, F. Wesley Schneider, Andrew M. Smith, and Chris’ wife Lisa, who wanted in on the action when she heard about the project. Following a review of the concepts provided by the authors, Chris selected 1 to 3 from each while he got to work on the back-story and designing the Devil-Lich and the pre-generated PCs. Chris says, “A few weeks later, I had all of the encounters and room maps. This was the best part: taking 18 encounters from seven creative minds and assembling them into three challenging dungeon levels. I designed three more encounters (plus a few hallways), and then laid all of the maps out on my basement floor to visualize the dungeon levels. For days I arranged and re-arranged, and tweaked the encounters until I was satisfied. Then I designed a few more encounters to round out the levels, and placed the pieces of the Devil-Lich’s phylactery throughout the three levels. Finally, I weaved it altogether into a coherent adventure.” A fury of playtesting followed. Many of the encounters had to be tweaked, some several times, because they were not lethal enough! “That is why many of the monsters are not standard and required templates,” says Chris. “It is really difficult to kill 15th level 3E characters!” Some of Joseph’s playtest stories can be found in the Publisher’s Note at the beginning of the module. The tournament ended up being quite a success. The Josh O’Connor Experiment (starring original members Josh O’Connor-Rose, Mark Karay, Juan Burriel, Michael Maenza, Dustin Short, and Matthew Filla, and last-round substitutes Andrew Brogan and Tom Caudron) was the first place team. Chris recalls getting quite a bit of negative feedback about how the pre-generated characters were not min/maxed. “The wizard...

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5E Writers Needed

Posted by on 11:10 am in Latest News | 0 comments

5E Writers Needed

Goodman Games is planning an expanded assortment of 5E products in 2017. If you are a published writer with experience working in the 5E rules set, we’d love to hear from you! E-mail us (info@goodman-games.com) to tell us more about...

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