DCC #29 and Norse mythology?

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Argamae
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DCC #29 and Norse mythology?

Post by Argamae » Thu Sep 13, 2007 8:17 am

Couldn't find this elsewhere, so I post it here:

The Adventure "The Isle of Fury" from Greg Oppedisano from DCC #29 (The Adventure Begins) mentions some "Scandi bards" (akin to Vikings) and "The Isle of Faroe" as well as "Niflheim" and other bits and pieces from Norse mythology (like the gods Odin and Loki). I am currently using this adventure in my ongoing DCC campaign (the PCs arrived there via some sort of teleport trap). So my question is: are those Scandi folk and the Isle an official part of the World of Áereth? And if so - where are they supposed to be found? In the far north, most likely...
Still - anything official?
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Post by Harley Stroh » Thu Sep 13, 2007 2:20 pm

A,

This was a huge discussion going into the last months of DCC world production. All the gods were lined out nearly 8 months prior, but as the later DCCs came in (especially Adventure Begins) they brought in a host of of new gods, and – in this case – the Nordic pantheon. Without the time to make the appropriate changes to either DCC World or AB, both went ahead.

So, the official 3.5 line is that the names of gods used in AB correspond with names of the gods listed in DCC world. Different peoples use different names for the same gods.

However, in play, it's tough to convince a player that Thor really isn't the Nordic Thor --- there's just too much cultural baggage attached.

Maybe this is the proof in this pudding: If DCC world ever gets reprinted, you won't being seeing Nordic gods.

But remember: it's your game. You want Thor and Asgard, you got 'em. Don't let me, Jeff, Mike or the books tell you otherwise.

//H

====

Edit: I realized you might simply be asking if the DCC adventure belongs in Áereth, and not so much about the process of pantheon creation. The answer is absolutely. And yes, upper north-west Northlands, along the coast.
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Post by gargoyle » Thu Sep 13, 2007 6:29 pm

Oopps...

Had I known that DCC was going to create a pantheon of official gods i would have chosen differently. I really like the research that goes into the creation of a module - I like to choose a different historical inspiration for my modules.

In The Isle of Faroe i looked to Scandinavian roots. In the Golden Palace of Zahadran i chose a Persian motif. In The Curse of the Barrens i tried to flavour the module with Amerindian themes and in the up coming "Valley of Indus" in the adventure continues I took inspiration from indian themes...

I am a social studies teacher and a history geek.

Harley of course has reigned in my love for ancient pantheons and directed my work so that it fits in the vast pantheon that is offered in the DCC gazetteer...

The gods from Zahadran are in the gaz - which is unbelievable as an authro to get to contribute to a persistant sandbox world where people go and play.

Unfortunately the the gods from the isle of faroe are not consistant - but can be renamed as is suggested to fit gods from the pantheon - or renamed and used as long forgotten cults and religions.

I hope you enjoyed the module - let me kno how it went!
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Post by JediOre » Fri Sep 14, 2007 7:13 am

gargoyle wrote:
I am a social studies teacher and a history geek.
From one history geek to another: Rock on!

P.S. -- Gargoyle, have you seen or read Pierre Briant's From Cyrus To Alexander? It is the most comprehensive work concerning the Persian Empire I've ever seen. For a fan of ancient history, it's a great read even at over a 1,000 pages.

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Post by gargoyle » Fri Sep 14, 2007 10:16 am

thanks i'll check this out!
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Post by Jeff LaSala » Fri Sep 14, 2007 11:04 am

DCC 35 offers up the Sancturn Pantheon, gods drawn directly from the pre-existing DCCs or fashioned in their spirit. But it's just an optional pantheon. To Harley's point, here's a short quote from the boxed set, and this I really think is true to the spirit of the setting:
GMs should feel free to alter the pantheons to suit the needs and themes of their campaigns. Whereas an epic story set in the Southlands might make frequent use of the Xulmec demigods, another campaign set in the Lostlands may never make mention of those endemic gods across the ocean. GMs are certainly invited to include new pantheons of their own or those borrowed from other mythos. This chapter assumes that the Sancturn Pantheon—many of whose members have been gathered from the DCCs—is the primary spiritual authority in the world of Áereth.

Other pantheons could be assigned to other Material Plane worlds, but still count followers from among the people of Áereth. Conversely, the gods of various pantheons could share dominion over this world. Finally, pantheons may be intermingled with the Sancturns, or the names used by the gods can vary to accommodate all gods in one. Variag, for example, may also be the same as the Norse god Ymir. Odin may be another name by which Choranus is known, and Tyr may be the same as Gorhan or Thormyr.
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Post by Argamae » Sun Sep 16, 2007 1:52 am

I realized you might simply be asking if the DCC adventure belongs in Áereth, and not so much about the process of pantheon creation. The answer is absolutely. And yes, upper north-west Northlands, along the coast.
@Harley: Thanks, yes, this was what I wanted to know first and foremost.
But the discussion about pantheons of the DCC world was also very interesting.

@gargoyle (and anyone who is interested):
In actual play I kept the exact location a secret. The PCs arrived on the Isel of Faroe via a teleport "trap". They were investigating the disappearence of a sage named Nalvor in Arvale City and found a still active teleport circle at the fella's house. When they stepped through they arrived at the Isle and began searching for the sage. Turned out said fellow was an expert on lost cultures and also dabbled in magic (which the paladin of Justicia among the party--being sent by his theocrat mentor--disapproved of). Nalvor had received some strange runic stones as well as some sort of headstone with a leering visage carved into it. After experimenting with it the headstone added a little magic "on his own" - and brought the fellow to Faroe.
The party proceeded boldly - and they failed miserably when they tried to take on Gudmundr and his monitor lizard. Having killed the lizard they were brought low by Gudmundr. Having already caught the "otherworldly" sage Nalvor, Gudmundr was somewhat intrigued by these newcomers and spared their lives. After keeping the party as work slaves for one day (they excavated a third rune stone from the hill) his fellow duergar Ari assumed the disguise of Nalvor (using Disguise Self) and questioned the party. They fell for it. Having discerned that they would offer nothing of interest to him he decided to use them for slave labor some more days and then kill them off. Luckily the party escaped on the next night--after some fierce battling against kobolds and Gudmundr, which the latter narrowly escaped by turning invisible. Gee, it was fun watching the players swearing for having to let their captor go. Heh heh.
Eventually they managed to eliminate both kobold barbarians on the old skandi barrows (using stealth and surprise). Then they sneaked up on one other burial mound (which contained the real Nalvor and both Ari and Gudmundr) and after some more fighting which eventually involved Grimmur the Ogre and nearly costing two PC lives they were victorious and freed Nalvor.
The sage was very much surprised seeing the party--and most importantly, seeing Corm (the paladin of Justicia) among them. Corm was the only one he knew personally and there was some nice roleplaying between Nalvor and Corm concering different religions and the use of magic. After much explaining about the old culture (Skandi) and the inscriptions upon the rune stones they decided to find a way back.
Nalvor sensed that some higher powers had their hand in this and suggested going to the temple of Loki in the caves. When they arrived they found the temple darkly lit by two candles casting strange shadows from the bas-reliefs on the walls. It was as if the scenes depicted there had come to life. Then a voice spoke to them, teasing them about having slain it's devoted servants (the duergar) and coming to the altar so seek atonement. Finally, after the voice announced that Nalvor had exactly "done what he was supposed to do", the voice fell silent and was gone.
All PCs except the dwarf Balt'zharr failed their save against will. The stout one alone could see a headstone with a leering visage upon the altar, very much like the one that brought Nalvor here the first time. After a lot of disbelieving going on (with the help of Balt'zharr) the party managed to see through the illusion and when they touched the stone all were transported back to Arvale City.
They are still wondering if it was Loki talking to them at the altar. And they are now quite unsure of whether they are still pawns in a greater game (which they are). Since I kept the weather always overcast they aren't really sure about the Isle of Faroe... was it still on Áereth or had they been transported to some other plane?
The story continues...
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Post by James Mishler » Mon Sep 17, 2007 7:59 pm

As mentioned elsewhere, you can add or subtract any deities or whole pantheons you wish, or use wholly different gods entirely.

For my Known Realms, for example, I use the gods straight out the original "Deities & Demigods" (the first print, with the Cthulhui and Melnibonean mythos) plus the "generic" 1E/2E humanoid and monstrous gods as developed over the years and best displayed in the 2E supplement, "Monster Mythology." I've adapted elements from the Known Realms pantheon to these (also developed a full series of related human cultures and languages to go with said pantheons). I've also added in some missing pantheons here and there, such as the Saxon and Slavic pantheons.

For example, Zhun is now Cthulhu, or Hastur, or any one of the Cthulhu Mythos gods as applicable. The Theocracy of the Lance reveres a trinity of Greco-Roman gods, Apollo, Athena, and Artemis. The Saxon pantheon is usually revered in the War Lands. The Slavic pantheon is revered in Koranth and Leherti, the Celtic in Cinai, Thire, and Nos Caen, and so forth. Plus, all the demi-god level demons and devils from MMI and MMII are actively recruiting worshippers...

The Norse pantheon is well represented in Morrain and Ternyziem, plus among the Aesmannar, a barbaric viking-style culture (descended from the Ermannar of Erheim of old) that I added in the lands along the Bay of Asur (which they, of course, call Aesir Bay). These people could be the equivalent of the Scandi from the adventure (maybe the Scandi are but one of the many tribes); Faroe Isle would be one of the many islands that dot the bay.
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Post by Jengenritz » Mon Sep 17, 2007 8:06 pm

For my Known Realms, for example, I use the gods straight out the original "Deities & Demigods" (the first print, with the Cthulhui and Melnibonean mythos)
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Post by gargoyle » Wed Sep 19, 2007 4:26 pm

Argamae wrote: @gargoyle (and anyone who is interested):
In actual play I kept the exact location a secret...
That is awesome... I love the way you made the island come to life!
Greg Oppedisano
Author: The Great City Campaign setting, PC Pearls, Sidetrek Adventure Weekly, GM Gems, DCC 48, DCC 49, DCC 43, DCC 32, DCC 29...
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